Thursday, 26 June 2014

ANCIENT SLAVS



  1. -Books to check 
  2. The Slavs by Marija Gimbutas - Jstor

    www.jstor.org/stable/306494



    Marija Gimbutas' The Slavs fills a sorely felt gap. It covers the period of the prehistoric and early Slavs before the formation of the Slavic states in the ninth 


  3. Giancarlo Tomezzoli
    THE “SPADA DI VERONA”
  4. http://www.scribd.com/doc/13889602/THE-VENETIC-INSCRIPTION-Es-120

  5.  Venetic Palindromes

     1: the bronze cup from „Scolo di Lozzo“ with the Venetic inscription Es 120


  6. PALINDROM
    Correct in her transcription, to wit:
    ALKOMNOMETLONŚIKOSENOGENESVILKENISHORVIONTEDONASAN
    erenownedVenetist,A.Marinetti[1],pp.181-182,asotherVenetistsoen,whenstumped for meaning, is cornered to having to resort to the artificeofselectingsomeveryoddnames for the portions of the inscription she cannot decrypt. She divides the wording of theinscription as follows:
    ALKOMNO METLON ŚIKOS ENOGENES VILKENIS HORVIONTE DONASAN

    SOLUTION;

    (“from below upward twining”) clearly indicates the inscription to be a pictorial representation
    of what in due course will sprout from the covered seedlings. By starting the passage at thebottom, he may also have intended to outwit the devil by placing the letters backwards.
    Line One
    Division
    NA SAN ODET NOI VROH SI NE KLI VSE NEG ON E S OKI SNOL TEMON MOK LA
    Present-day literary Slovene word sequence and punctuation
    NA SEN ODET, NAJ VRAG SI NE KLIJ VSE,NEGO ON Z OČMI LE JE SNUL TEMEN MOK!
    English translation
    COVERED FOR SLEEP, MAY THE DEVIL NOT HAVE EVERYTHING GERMINATE FORHIM, BUT LET HIM RATHER WITH THE EYES SUSPEND AS THREAD ON THE LOOMTHE DARK MOISTURE

    This is a prayer against Vrag (slavic word for Devil)
    Which really is Virag, Virgo, Deva, Djeva, Div (giant), Magda---she have a lot of names.

    And in this case HORV is Vroh-Vrag,  Vrygian, Brygian, Phrygian etc
    (this makes me lol a lot)

  7. Anthony Ambrozic, Pavel Serafimov, Giancarlo Tomezzoli
    THE VENETIC INSCRIPTION Es 120 ON
    THE CUP OF “SCOLO DI LOZZO”
    Abstract
    Reputedly the oldest Venetic inscription, Es 120 was found in 1931 in locality “Scolo di Lozzo”
    near Este (Veneto – Italy). The inscription dates to not later than the middle of the 6th century
    BC. A. Marinetti divides the wording of the inscription as follows: ALKOMNO METLON
    ŚIKOS ENOGENES VILKENIS HORVIONTE DONASAN. According to her translation three
    offerors named Sikos, Enogenes and Vilkenis are making a votive offering to the Dioscuri
    (Alkomno) at their temple, which allegedly was located near the locality of Lozzo. The inscription
    is in fact a palindrome starting at the bottom of the inscription. The palindrome’s first line
    can be read as follows: NA SAN ODET NOI VROH SI NE KLI VSE NEG ON E S OKI SNOL
    TEMON MOK LA and is followed by its inverse counterpart running downward: AL KOM
    NOMETL ON ŚI KOS E NOGE NE SVIL K E NIS HOR VION T E DONASAN. The first line
    can be translated as: COVERED FOR SLEEP, MAY THE DEVIL NOT HAVE EVERYTHING
    GERMINATE FOR HIM, BUT LET HIM RATHER WITH THE EYES SUSPEND AS THREAD
    ON THE LOOM THE DARK MOISTURE; whereas the inverse counterpart can be loosely
    translated as: BUT TO WHOM DID HE PILE UP A PIECE? MAY THE ONE OFFERED TO
    YOU, FROM BELOW UPWARD TWINING, NOT COME TO HARM! The palindrome in
    its first line is a hopeful admonition to the dark powers to keep a seed-containing basin free
    of mold. In its second line it provides inside the message the indication of how the inscription
    should be read, i.e. from below upward. The astounding close similarity of the words in the
    palindrome with the words of contemporary literary Slovene language, Slovene dialects and
    other Slavic languages indicates that Slavic was incredibly uniform and undiversified in the
    past, so that Venetic, Slavenetic, Old Early Slavic, Old Phrygian, Dura Europos Macedonian,
    and early Thracian were one and the same language.
    Introduction
    Reputedly the oldest Venetic inscription, Es 120 appears on a well-preserved bronze container.
    It was found in 1931 in locality “Scolo di Lozzo” above the regional road Montagnana
    – Este, approximately 200 meters from the Torre Bridge, at the depth of about 5 meters. It was
    hidden by one of the workers for 30 years. Scholars now estimate that the inscription dates to
    not later than the middle of the 6th century BC.
    The cup and the inscription
    The cup and the inscription (cf. Fig. 1) are fully described in a paper by Locatelli and
    Marinetti [1], pp. 181-182. 167
    The two original handles of the cup disappeared. The inscription is engraved on one external
    side of the cup. It was written in continuo without punctuation. The orientation of the
    characters appears to indicate that it should be read from above downward.
    Transcription
    Correct in her transcription, to wit:
    ALKOMNOMETLONŚIKOSENOGENESVILKENISHORVIONTEDONASAN
    The renowned Venetist, A. Marinetti [1], pp. 181-182, as other Venetists often, when
    stumped for meaning, is cornered to having to resort to the artifice of selecting some very odd
    names for the portions of the inscription she cannot decrypt. She divides the wording of the
    inscription as follows:
    ALKOMNO METLON ŚIKOS ENOGENES VILKENIS HORVIONTE DONASAN
    According to her translation [1], pp. 181-182, three offerors named Sikos, Enogenes and
    Vilkenis are making a votive offering to the Dioscuri (Alkomno) at their temple, which allegedly
    was located near Lozzo, cf. [1], p. 79.
     Some of the other transcriptions and interpretations are presented in [2]. Unfortunately,
    since the inscription is a palindrome starting at the bottom, the interpretation presented in [2],
    although struggling valiantly in varying degrees, offers no better results.
    The palindrome
    The Greek word palindromos meant “running backward”. The palindrome format was intended
    to contain a secret and have eternal potency. In the inscription at hand, an indispensable
    tool to successful decipherment will be grammar. It is astounding how faithfully the inscriber
    follows its Guidelines. Even more astounding is the unyielding tenacity of the Slovene, bucking
    the headwinds of 2,500 years of tidal erosion in every side.
    Starting at the bottom, the palindrome’s first line will be followed by its inverse counterpart
    running downward. Intending the twining plant as an offering, the inscriber in NIS HOR VION
    Fig. 1: the bronze cup from „Scolo di Lozzo“ with the Venetic inscription Es 120.168
    (“from below upward twining”) clearly indicates the inscription to be a pictorial representation
    of what in due course will sprout from the covered seedlings. By starting the passage at the
    bottom, he may also have intended to outwit the devil by placing the letters backwards.
    Line One
    Division
    NA SAN ODET NOI VROH SI NE KLI VSE NEG ON E S OKI SNOL TEMON MOK LA
    Present-day literary Slovene word sequence and punctuation
    NA SEN ODET, NAJ VRAG SI NE KLIJ VSE,
    NEGO ON Z OČMI LE JE SNUL TEMEN MOK!
    English translation
    COVERED FOR SLEEP, MAY THE DEVIL NOT HAVE EVERYTHING GERMINATE FOR
    HIM, BUT LET HIM RATHER WITH THE EYES SUSPEND AS THREAD ON THE LOOM
    THE DARK MOISTURE.
    Commentary
    Comparing Slovene rendition to the Venetic, one is struck by how close the two languages
    are. Were it not for the word: LA (the Sln.: LE of today) (for Sln. see the Abbreviations Table),
    even the word sequence and sentence structure of both are similar. Only the feature of okanje
    (the tendency to substitute letter O for A and other vowels), in the Venetic grudgingly gives
    some ground to the passage of about 2,500 years. And even there, this may have been due
    to a dialectal peculiarity of the inscriber or the area where the cup was found. Seen in NOI
    (for Sln. “NAJ”), in VROH (for Sln.”VRAG”), in ŚNOL (for Sln.”SNUL”) and in TEMON (for
    Sln.”TEMEN”), in Line One and again in NOMETL (for dial. Sln. NAMETәL) and VION
    (for Sln. “VIJEN) in the Reverse Line, only the feature of okanje can here lay claim to any
    sort of an individual Venetic identity (in juxta-position to the generally Slavic of the time)
    for the language of Es 120.
    Comparison and parsing
    NA: gsl. (see the Abbreviations Table) with meanings ranging from “to, on, upon,
    at, in, up, over”. A prep., it takes either the acc. or loc., here governings SAN
    in the acc. Cf. inscriptions M-01b and P-04a in [3], pp. 32-35 and 48-50. For
    corresponding Slavic equivalents see [4].
    SAN: gsl. for “sleep” and “dream”, ranging from SC. “san”, to R. “son”, and Cz. and
    Sln.“sen”. N., masc., sing., acc., governed for case by NA. For corresponding
    Slavic equivalents see [4].
    ODET: Sln. participle from infinitive ODETI – “to cover”; v., masc., sing. It appears
    from the context that ODET relates to VSE. However, in lit. Sln. VSE is of neuter
    gender, which would predicate the form to be ODETO. What comes to the rescue 169
    is dial Sln., which has ODET as the form for neuter nouns and pronouns. Being
    an artificial creation of as recently 175 years ago, the lit. Sln. has to give priority
    to dial. Sln. in all such cases of conflict. Contextually also, it is unlikely that
    ODET relates to VROH, which is masc. For the relating noun ODEJA - “cover”
    see corresponding Csl., SC., Chk., Mac., Blg., R. and Slk. equivalents in [4].
    NOI: gsl. part. and conj., NOJ and NEJ are dial. Sln. equivalents of lit. Sln. NAJ - “let,
    may, let it, may it”. See NEY in inscription W-010 in [3], pp. 8-10. For corresponding
    Slavic equivalents see [4].
    VROH: gsl., ranging from Sln. VRAG - “devil” to Cz. VRAH – “killer, enemy”, to R.
    VOROG – “enemy devil”. For corresponding Slavic equivalents see [5]. N., masc.,
    nom., sing., subject of KLI. See ARAG in ARAGAYUN in the inscription M-
    01bin [3], pp. 32-35.
    SI: gsl., prn., dat., sing. of the lit. Sln. shortened reflex. SEBI –“to himself, to oneself”.
    For corresponding Slavic equivalents see SE I in [4].
    NE: gsl., adv. and conj. – “no, not”, governing SI, KLI. Cf. inscriptions X and XL in
    [6], pp 17-20, 62-69. For corresponding Slavic equivalents see [4].
    KLI: lit. Sln. KLIJ from inf. KLITI – “to germinate, to sprout”. V. imp., sing., its subj.
    being VROH, and its obj. being VSE. For corresponding Csl., SC., Blg., P.,
    Kash.,Cz., Ll. equivalents see [4].
    VSE: gsl. with variations of VSE and SVE – “all, everything”. Prn., ntr., sing., acc., obj.
    of KLI. For corresponding Slavic equivalents see VES in [4].
    NEG: conj., lit. Sln. NEGO – “but, but rather”. For corresponding Ocsl., SC., Blg., R.,
    Ukr., Br., Cz., Slk., Ul. equivalents see [4].
    ON: sl. – “he”, prn., masc., sing., 3rd prs., nom. Subj. of E ŚNOL. See inscriptions IV,
    [6], pp. 7-11; XXV, [6], pp. 37-38; XXVI, [6], pp.39-43; XXVIII, [6], pp. 44-45,
    XXIX, [6], 45-46, and XXXV, [6], pp.55-57. For corresponding Slavic equivalents
    see [5].
    E: gsl., lit. Sln. JE – “is”, v., 3rd prs. sing., pres. of BITI – “to be”, serving as aux. to
    ŚNOL. Due to its frequent occurrence as aux. v., it can be found in every second
    inscription in [3].
    S: together with Z – “with, from”; S and Z alternate depending on which letter the word
    they governs commences with. A prep. taking the instr. case it governs OKI. See
    inscription W-08, [3], pp. 38-42. For corresponding Slavic equivalents see Z in [5].
    OKI: an arch., pl., instr. form of OKO – “eye”. With an irregular declension, OKO
    now appears only in the nom. and acc., sing. For other sing. cases the root now
    changes to OČES – and to OČ – and OČES – for pl. cases. For corresponding
    SC., Blg., Csl., R., Cz., P., Slk., Ul, Ll. equivalents see [4].
    ŚNOL: lit. Sln. part. SNUL, from inf. SNUTI - “to place the basic thread on a loom”. Its
    aux. is E, its subj. ON and its obj.: TEMON MOK. V., part., sing., masc., nom..
    The only corresponding Slavic equivalents are Csl. SNUTI – “to place the basic
    thread on a loom” and old Cz. inf. SNOUT – “to plan, to warp, to knit”.
    TEMON: Sln. TEMEN – “dark”, adj. of TEMA – “darkness”. Adj., masc., sing., acc. agreeing
    in gender, number and case with MOK. For corresponding Ocsl., SC., R., Cz.,
    P. equivalents see [5]. 170
    MOK a root of a gsl. adj. MOKER – “wet, moist”. N., masc., sing., acc., obj. of E ŚNOL.
    Of infrequent usage, it appears idiomatically in adages like SONCE GRE NA
    MOK “it is getting ready to rain”. For MOKER see [4].
    LA: gsl., lit Sln. LE – “let, may it be, let it be that”. See inscriptions W-01b, M-01a
    [3], pp. 17-20, pp. 29-32. For corresponding Slavic equivalents see [4].
    Reverse Line
    Division
    AL KOM NOMETL ON ŚI KOS E NOGE NE SVIL K E NIS HOR VION T E DONASAN
    Present-day dialectal and literary Slovene for each word.
    AL(dial) KOM(dial) NOMETəL(dial) ON ŚI KOS JE NOGE NE ZVIL Kə (dial) E NIS GOR
    VION Tə (dial) JE DONAŠAN
    Today’s literary Slovene word sequence and punctuation.
    ALI KOMU NEMETEL ON SI KOS JE? NOGE NE ZVIL KI BI, NIZ GOR VIJEN, KI TI JE
    DONAŠAN!
    The humouring freedom of the chiding rhetorical question in the first sentence, where the
    devil is depicted as almost childlike, is followed by the structures of the palindrome format
    constraining the inscriber in the last. Accordingly, a looser rendering for the word sequence
    as well as interpretation in both Sln. and Eng. is called for. It should also be kept in mind that
    the letters are no longer running backwards and the devil can now read them.
    Looser literary Slovene rendition.
    ALI KOMU NAMETEL ON SI KOS JE? NAJ, NIZ GOR VIJEN, NOGE NE ZVIJE, KI TI
    JE DONAŠAN !
    Strained English rendition.
    BUT TO WHOM DID HE TROW TOGETHER A PIECE? MAY HE NOT TWIST A LEG,
    WHICH FROM BELOW UPWARD TWINING, IS BEING BROUGHT TO YOU.
    Looser English translation.
    BUT TO WHOM DID HE PILE UP A PIECE? MAY THE ONE OFFERED TO YOU, FROM
    BELOW UPWARD TWINING, NOT COME TO HARM!
    Comparison and parsing.
    AL: dial. Sln. for lit. Sln. ALI – “but, however, or”, conj. and adv. Cf. inscriptions W-09
    and W-08 in [3], pp. 37-38, 38-42. For corresponding SC. and dial. R equivalents
    see [5].
    KOM: dial Sln. For lit. Sln. KOMU – “to whom”. It is a prn., dat., sing. of KDO – “who”,
    having no pl. form. For corresponding SC., Mac., Cz., R., Ukr., Br., P., Slk., Ll.
    equivalents see [4].171
    NOMETL: okanje for dial. Sln. participle NOMETL from lit. Sln. inf. NAMETATI – “to
    throw in quantity, to fill up by throwing”. It is a combination of gsl. prefix NA
    – “to, on, upon, at in, up, over” and inf. METATI – “to throw”. For corresponding
    Ocsl., SC., R., Cz. equivalents see [5]. Its aux. is E.
    ON: gsl. – “he”, prn., masc., sing., 3rd prs., nom. subject of SI E NOMETL. Cf. inscriptions
    IV, [6], pp. 7-11; XXV, [6], pp. 37-38; XXVI, [6], pp.39-43; XXVIII, [6], pp.
    44-45, XXIX, [6], pp. 45-46, and XXXV, [6], pp.55-57, and W-010, [3], pp. 8-10.
    ŚI: gsl., reflex. prn. – “to himself, to oneself ”, 3rd prs., sing, masc., dat., relating to ON,
    being a shortened form of reflexive SEBI. For corresponding Slavic equivalents
    see SE I in [4].
    KOS: gsl. – “piece, portion”, n., masc., sing., acc., obj. of SI E NOMETL. Cf. inscriptions
    XLIX, [6], pp. 83-85 and IX, [6], p. 16. For corresponding Slavic equivalents see
    [4].
    E: gsl. JE – “is”, v., 3rd prs. sing., pres. of BITI – “to be”, serving as aux. to
    NOMETL.
    NOGE: gsl. NOGA – “foot, leg”, N., fem., sing., gen. The genitive case here is of signifi-
    cance. It singularizes NOGE. As obj., the noun NOGE would normally be in the
    acc. case. However, when a verb in the Sln. is governed by a negative, the rules of
    grammar call for a genitive case. Here, we have the negative NE governing E
    SVIL of which NOGE is the obj. Accordingly, NOGE is sing., because the pl. gen. is
    NOG, as it is also from the dual.
    NE: gsl., adv. and conj. – “no, not”, governing E SVIL. Cf. inscriptions X and XL in [6],
    pp 17-20, 62-69. For corresponding Slavic equivalents see [4].
    SVIL: ZVIL is part. of inf. ZVITI – “to twist, to contort”. In its relationship to NOGA
    it means “to twist one’s foot, to wrench one’s foot”. ZVITI is a completed action
    counterpart of imperfected inf. VITI. It is governed by NE and has the E between
    K and NIZ as aux. and NOGE as its obj.
    K: Kə - dial. Sln. for lit. Sln. KI – “who, which, that which, the one which”. The meaning
    depends on the person or thing the word relates to and may vary depending
    on the context. Here, it serves as the subj. of NE SVIL E, of E DONASAN and
    E VION. As a relative prn. it introduces the subordinate clauses K E NIS HOR
    VION - “that which is from below upward twining” and K TE DONASAN – “that
    which is being brought to you”. For corresponding Csl., SC., Chk., Mac., Blg., R.,
    Ukr., P., Slk., Ul., Ll. equivalents see [4]. E: gsl., JE – “is”, v., 3rd prs. sing., pres. of
    BITI – “to be”, serving as aux. to SVIL and VION.
    NIS: lit. Sln., adv. NIZ – “down, alongside, below” is the root of the gsl. adj. NIZEK
    – “low”. Preceding HOR – “up, upwards”, it points to the starting point of the
    twining palindrome. For corresponding Csl., SC., Mac., Blg., R., Ukr., P., Slk.
    equivalents see [4].
    HOR: dial. Sln. HOR – “up, upwards” is still in use in some dialects, but the lit. counterpart
    GOR has much wider currency. Cf. inscription G-105, [3], pp. 56-57. For
    corresponding Csl., SC., Mac., Blg., Cz., P., Ul., Ll. equivalents see [4].
    VION: an okanje form of dial. Sln. VIJAN and lit. Sln. VIJEN – “twining, twisting”. A v.,
    part., masc., sing., nom., agreeing in gender, number, case and person with K, its 172
    aux. being E. Cf. inscription M-01b, [3], pp. 32-35. Its inf. is VITI – “to twine, to
    twist”. For corresponding Csl., SC., R., Cz. equivalents see [5].
    T: dial. Sln. Tə for lit. Sln. TI – “to you”, a shortened form for TEBI is a pers. prn.,
    2nd pers., sing., dat.. Cf. inscriptions M-04 and B-01 in [3], pp. 27-29, 52-56. For
    other corresponding Ocsl., SC., R., Cz. equivalents see [5].
    E: gsl., JE – “is”, v., 3rd prs. sing., pres. of BITI – “to be”, serving as aux. to
    DONASAN.
    DONASAN: the lit. Sln. DONAŠAN is a nonperfective, continuing-action participle of
    inf. DONAŠATI – “to continue to bring, produce, or bear fruit”. Here the verbal
    conjugational inflection indicates an incomplete status of the action. As v., part.,
    masc., sing, nom., it agrees in gender, number, case and person with K. It is
    composed of prefix DO, much employed in idiomatic structures with meaning of
    “up to, as far as, until” depending on the context, and an imperfective, continuing
    -action form of the gsl., inf. NOSITI – “to carry, to bear”. For corresponding
    Slavic equivalents see [4].
    Conclusion
    A hopeful admonition to the dark powers to keep a seed-containing basin free of mould,
    the present inscription Es 120 has a parallel in the Old Phrygian, 5th century BC, bidding of:
    E STAT OIAV VUN – “infertility keep out “ – cf. inscription G-144 in [3], pp. 11-12. In fact,
    parallels with Old Phrygian and Slavenetic vocabulary, syntax and morphology generally still
    echo in the preponderance of the wording in the inscription being gsl.
    Especially, the inscription Es 120 attests to the astounding state of linguistic preservation
    of the Slovene language. It is also clear confirmation of the claim by the noted Slovenian etymologist
    F. Bezlaj [7], pp. 88, that “in the 8th century AD Slavic was incredibly uniform and
    undiversified”. Hence, its decryption points to such a state of affairs having been even more
    uniform 1,200 years earlier. It serves as a direct confirmation of the claim in [3], p. 122, that
    whether one appends the term of Venetic, Slavenetic, Old Early Slavic, Old Phrygian, Dura
    Europos Macedonian [6], pp. 74-86, and early Thracian were one and the same language.
    Bibliography
    1. Este preromana: una città e i suoi santuari, a cura di Angela Ruta Serafini Ed. Canova,
    Treviso 2002, ISBN 88-8409-056-3
    2. V Vodopivec, Študija prečrkovani in branj najstarejšega venetskega napisa, Proceedings of
    the Third International Topical Conference Ancient Settlers of Europe, Založništvo Jutro,
    Ljubljana, 2005, 121-130
    3. A Ambrozic, Gordian Knot Unbound, Cythera Press, Toronto 2002
    4. F Bezlaj, Etimološki slovar slovenskega jezika, Mladinska knjiga, Ljubljana 1971, 1982,
    1995
    5. M Snoj, Slovenski etimološki slovar, Mladinska knjiga, Ljubljana 1997
    6. A Ambrozic, Adieu to Brittany, Cythera Press, Toronto 1999
    7. F Bezlaj, Eseji o slovenskem jeziku, Mladinska knjiga, Ljubljana 1967173
    Povzetek
    Venetski napis Es 120 na čaši iz “Scolo di Lozzo”
    Najstarejši venetski napis Es 120 so našli leta 1931 v kraju “Scolo di Lozzo” pri Estah (Veneto
    – Italija). Nastal naj bi najkasneje kot sredi 6. stol. A. Marinetti ga razdeli v naslednje besede:
    ALKOMNO METLON ŚIKOS ENOGENES VILKENIS HORVIONTE DONASAN. Po njenem
    prevodu trije darovalci, Sikos, Enogenes in Vilkenis darujejo Dioskurom v njihovem templju,
    ki naj bi bil pri predelu Lozzo. Napis je v resnici palindrom, ki se začne spodaj. Od spodaj
    navzgor beremo kot: NA SAN ODET NOI VROH SI NE KLI VSE NEG ON E S OKI SNOL
    TEMON MOK LA, v nasprotni smeri pa AL KOM NOMETL ON ŚI KOS E NOGE NE SVIL
    K E NIS HOR VION T E DONASAN. Prvi del lahko prevedemo kot NA SEN ODET, NAJ
    VRAG SI NE KLIJ VSE, NEGO ON Z OČMI LE JE SNUL TEMEN MOK!, v nasprotno smer
    pa kot ALI KOMU NEMETEL ON SI KOS JE? NOGE NE ZVIL KI BI, NIZ GOR VIJEN, KI
    TI JE DONAŠAN! Prvi del nadebudno opominja temne sile, naj pazijo, da seme v posodi
    ostane brez plesnivosti. Drugi del pa je sporočilo, kako je treba brati ta napis, to je od spodaj
    navzgor. Presenetljiva podobnost besed v palindromu z besedami v knjižni slovenščini,
    slovenskih narečjih in drugih slovanskih jezikih kaže, da so bili slovanski jeziki v preteklosti
    neverjetno enoviti, tako da so bile venetščina, slovenetščina, praslovanščina, stara frigijščina,
    makedonščina v Dura Europos in zgodnja tračanščina verjetno en in isti jezik.
    Table of Abbreviations
    Acc. Accusative Mac. Macedonian
    Adj Adjective Masc. Masculine
    Adv. Adverb N. Noun
    Arch. Archaic Nom. Nominative
    Aux. Auxiliary v. Ntr. Neuter
    Blg. Bulgarian Obj. Object
    Br. Belorussian Ocsl. Old Church Slavonic
    Chk. Chakavian Croatian P. Polish
    Conj. Conjunctive Part. Participle
    Cr. Croatian Pl. Plural
    Csl. Church Slavonic Prep. Preposition
    Cz. Czech Pres. Present tense
    Dat. Dative Prn. Pronoun
    Dial Dialectal Prs. Person
    Fem. Feminine R. Russian
    Gen. Genitive Reflex. Reflexive
    Gsl. Generally Slavic SC. Serbo-Croatian
    Imp Imperative Sing. Singular
    Inf. Infinitive Subj. Subject
    Instr. Instrumental case Slk. Slovak
    Kash. Kashubian Sln. Slovene
    Lit. Literary Ukr. Ukranian
    Loc. Locative case Ul. Upper Lusatian
    L. Lusatian V. Verb
    Ll. Lower Lusatian

Thursday, 15 May 2014

HELL Goddess




Words that have same energetic value as hell are
Hell
Hollow
Holy
Hello
Whole
Hole
It is obvious that these words describe very opposing MEANings.
same is for almost all germanic languages which are youngest.
in dutch;
hel 
hol 
heilig 
Hallo 
geheel
in german;
Hölle 
hohl 
heilig 
Hallo 
ganze 
Loch

Goddess Hell

By Sjur Cappelen Papazian at - http://aratta.wordpress.com/page/2/
Hel (“the hidden” from the word hel, “to conceal”) is one of the most misunderstood and misinterpreted Goddess aspects in history. She is described as half white/half blue, or half living/half rotten.

She represents the nature cycle in its entirety, she represents the life and light of spring rising from the roots of the underworld and she represents the dying autumn nature summoning the cold winter, and from this dark times what will lay dead on the ground will be absorbed by the underground to feed a new fertile summer. She is a deep and mighty earth and ice energy who gives life from the darkness – life, death and reincarnation of nature and all living creatures. She is keeper of the underworld and keeper of the source of the origin.

While the other goddesses/giantess, like Freyja, Idunn and Skadi etc., represent specific aspect of life and nature, Hel represent the full cycle of life and death. Althought there is no evidence of a cult of she could have been the supreme Mother nature, and might never had a cult because there were other goddesses who all inherited some specific aspect of Hel and people would rather make a ceremony for different goddesses depending the time of the year or the occasion.

She must have meant something very special since the early Christian church used her name as a scare tactic to frighten the masses into “righteous” acts (instead of allowing free will to guide their actions to do what is right) and to say that all the people who have something to do with heathensim and all of them they chose to define as evil would go to hell.

It seems that Hel actually represents a very old mother earth cult, but that she has been greatly perverted through the years by patriarchal domination. She has fallen from her privileged position as guardian and ruler through years of being represented as an evil, ugly entity waiting to devour and torture lost souls.

To get the real story, we have to go back to the early Nordic people and look this death Goddess in the face. May we learn and dispel the slander of years by seeing her for the protector, judge, and guide that she originally represented.

The old Old Norse word Hel derives from Proto-Germanic *khalija, which means “one who covers up or hides something”, which itself derives from Proto-Indo-European *kel-, meaning “conceal”. The cognate in English is the word Hell which is from the Old English forms hel and helle. Related terms are Old Frisian, helle, German Hölle and Gothic halja. Other words more distantly related include hole, hollow, hall, helmet and cell, all from the aforementioned Indo-European root *kel-.

The word Hel is found in Norse words and phrases related to death such as Helför (“Hel-journey,” a funeral) and Helsótt (“Hel-sickness,” a fatal illness). The Norwegian word “heilag/hellig” which means “sacred” is directly related etymologically to the name “Hel”, and the same goes for the English word “holy”.

Hel is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. In addition, she is mentioned in poems recorded in Heimskringla and Egils saga that date from the 9th and 10th centuries, respectively.

In the Prose Edda book Gylfaginning, her appearance is described as half black and half white flesh-coloured and further as having a gloomy, downcast appearance. Her body and face were described as half in light and half in darkness. She was half dead and half alive. Her face was at once beautiful to look upon and horrific in form.

Hel governs the world beyond that of the living. Hel governs the world beyond that of the living. In magic, she makes thin the veil between worlds. Seidhr [SAY-theer] or Nordic shamans call upon Her protection and wear the helkappe, a magic mask, to render them invisible (like Hades helm of invisibility) and enable them to pass through the gateway into the realm of death and spirit. In divination, her special symbol is Hagalaz, hail: The embodiment of the icy realm She rules. Hel stands at the crossroads in judgment of souls who pass into her realm.

In the Poetic Edda, Prose Edda, and Heimskringla, Hel is referred to as a daughter of Loki, the trickster, and Angrboða, the giantess, along with the wolf Fenrir, the wolf who would destroy Asgard during Ragnarok, and the serpent Jörmungandr, the Midhgard serpent who lies at the bottom of the ocean wrapped around the world with his tail in his mouth (it is he that holds the world together).

Once the gods found that these three children are being brought up in the land of Jötunheimr, and when the gods “traced prophecies that from these siblings great mischief and disaster would arise for them” then the gods expected a lot of trouble from the three children, partially due to the nature of the mother of the children, yet worse so due to the nature of their father.

Odin sent the gods to gather the children and bring them to him. Upon their arrival, Odin threw Jörmungandr into the deep sea that lies round all lands, then threw Hel into the netherworld, Niflheim, and bestowed upon her authority over nine worlds, in that she must administer board and lodging to those sent to her, and that is those who die of sickness or old age. She becomes the ruler of that underworld to which souls who have not died in battle will depart.

As thanks for making Her ruler of the netherworld, Hel makes a gift to Odin. She gives him two ravens, Huginn and Muninn (Thought and Memory). Ravens are messengers between this realm and the next, opening pathways to death’s realm.

In Niflheim Hel has great mansions with extremely high walls and immense gates, a hall called Éljúðnir, a dish called Hunger, a knife called Famine, the servant Ganglati (Old Norse “lazy walker”), the serving-maid Ganglöt (also “lazy walker”), the entrance threshold Stumbling-block, the bed Sick-bed, and the curtains Gleaming-bale.

In Norse mythology, Hel (also called Hela or Hell) is a being who presides over a realm of the same name, Helheim, where she receives a portion of the dead, and to “go to Hel” is to die. As Hel was home to the dishonorable dead, Norse tradition usually referred to the departed souls that were sent there as the Náir (sing. nár – “cadaver”, “deceased spirit”, corpses of the damned).

To avoid confusion between the two, a number of academic studies in Teutonic literature have often referred to this underworld as Helheim (from Old Norse heimr, heima – “abode”, “region”, “world”, Hel’s domain) or Helvíti (from Old Icel. víti, deriv. of O.E. wite – “fine”, “sconce”, “penalty”, Hel’s place of punishment).

In late Icelandic sources, varying descriptions of Hel are given and various figures are described as being buried with items that will facilitate their journey to Hel after their death. In the Poetic Edda, Brynhildr’s trip to Hel after her death is described and Odin, while alive, also visits Hel upon his horse Sleipnir.

In Snorri Sturluson’s Prose Edda, Baldr goes to Hel upon death and subsequently Hermóðr uses Sleipnir to attempt to retrieve him. The “Hel-shoes” are described in Gísla saga as shoes placed upon the feet of a corpse so that the soul of the recently deceased can enter Valhalla (from Old Norse Valhöll ” the hall of the slain”), in Norse mythology, a majestic, enormous hall located in Asgard, ruled over by the god Odin.

In the Prose Edda book Gylfaginning, Hel is described as having been appointed by the god Odin as ruler of a realm of the same name, located in Niflheim (“Mist Home”, the “Abode of Mist” or “Mist World”), one of the Nine Worlds and is a location in Norse mythology which overlaps with the notions of Niflhel and Hel.

The name Niflheimr only appears in two extant sources, Gylfaginning and the much debated Hrafnagaldr Óðins. Niflheim is a world of ice and fog, and from this realm flows the 11 Elivagar rivers all coming from the one source Hvergelmir. The Elivagar rivers are the link between ice and fire and life was born from them.

Niflhel (“Misty Hel”; Nifel being cognate with Nebel, a German and Latin root meaning cloud) is the name of a location in Norse mythology which appears in the Eddic poems Vafþrúðnismál and Baldrs draumar, and also in Snorri Sturluson’s Gylfaginning. Niflhel overlaps with the notions of Niflheimr and Hel.

In Gylfaginning by Snorri Sturluson, Gylfi, the old king of Scandinavia, receives an education in Norse mythology from Odin himself in the guise of three men. Gylfi learns from Odin (as Þriði) that Odin gave the first man his spirit, and that the spirits of just men will live forever in Gimlé, whereas those of evil men will live forever in Niflhel.

Niflheim was primarily a realm of primordial ice and cold, with nine frozen rivers. According to Gylfaginning, Niflheim was one of the two primordial realms, the other one being Muspelheim, the realm of fire.

Between these two realms of cold and heat, creation began when its waters mixed with the heat of Muspelheim to form a “creating steam”. Later, it became the abode of Hel, a goddess daughter of Loki, and the afterlife for her subjects, those who did not die a heroic or notable death.

Because she accepts all to Helheim, she also becomes the judge to determine the fate of each soul in the afterlife. The evil dead are banished to a realm of icy cold death (a fate that the Nordic people found much worse in telling than a lake of fire) and torture.

This particular aspect of Hel’s realm was the basis for the Judeo-Christian “hell” to which sinners are banished and tortured for eternity. Unlike the Judeo-Christian concept, Helheim also served as the shelter and gathering place of souls to be reincarnated. Hel watches over those who died peacefully of old age or illness. She cares for children and women who die in childbirth. She guides those souls who do not choose the path of war and violence through the circle of death to rebirth.

One of the stories involving Hel is the decent of Balder into Helheim. The Prose Edda details that Hel rules over vast mansions with many servants in her underworld realm and plays a key role in the attempted resurrection of the god Baldr, which Loki arranged for to die by tricking him into a rigged contest. Because the contest was hosted in Asgard Balder could not return to that place in death. His relocation sent him to the only other realm for the dead, Hel’s domain. His arrival to Helheim was welcomed with banquet and festival, proof that not all of Hel’s realm was torturous.

The goddess Frigg asks who among the Æsir will earn all her love and favour by riding to Hel, the location, to try to find Baldr, and offer Hel herself a ransom.

The god Hermóðr volunteers and sets off upon the eight-legged horse Sleipnir to Hel. Hermóðr arrives in Hel’s hall, finds his brother Baldr there, and stays the night. The next morning, Hermóðr begs Hel to allow Baldr to ride home with him, and tells her about the great weeping the Æsir have done upon Baldr’s death.

Hel says the love people have for Baldr that Hermóðr has claimed must be tested, stating: “If all things in the world, alive or dead, weep for him, then he will be allowed to return to the Æsir. If anyone speaks against him or refuses to cry, then he will remain with Hel.”

Later in the chapter, after the female jötunn Þökk refuses to weep for the dead Baldr, she responds in verse, ending with “let Hel hold what she has.”

Most details about Hel, as a figure, are not found outside of Snorri’s writing in Gylfaginning. When older skaldic poetry says that people are ‘in’ rather than ‘with’ Hel, it is a place rather than a person, and this is assumed to be the older conception. The word Hel is generally used simply to signify death or the grave, and the word often appears as the equivalent to the English ‘death’. The noun and place Hel likely originally simply meant “grave”. The personification came later.

Jacob Grimm theorized that Hel (whom he refers to here as Halja, the theorized Proto-Germanic form of the term) is essentially an image of a greedy, unrestoring, female deity and that the higher we are allowed to penetrate into our antiquities, the less hellish and more godlike may Halja appear.

Of this we have a particularly strong guarantee in her affinity to the Indian Bhavani, who travels about and bathes like Nerthus and Holda, but is likewise called Kali or Mahakali, the great black goddess. In the underworld she is supposed to sit in judgment on souls. This office, the similar name and the black hue, make her exceedingly like Halja, one of the oldest and commonest conceptions of Germanic heathenism.

Scholarly theories have been proposed about Hel’s potential connections to figures appearing in the 11th century Old English Gospel of Nicodemus and Old Norse Bartholomeus saga postola, potential Indo-European parallels to Bhavani, Kali, and Mahakali, and her origins.

Hel seems to be connected to other Germanic goddesses: Frau Holde or Holle for instance. In German legends, Frau Holda was the protectoress of agriculture and women’s crafts. Her name and the names Huld and Hulda may be cognate with that of the Scandinavian being known as the huldra.

In German legends, ‘frau Holda’ was the protectoress of women’s crafts, but none so much as spinning, an activity with strong magical connotations and links to the other world. Frau Holda teaches, inspires and rewards the hard worker, sometimes finishing an industrious worker’s reels for her during the night, but she punishes the lazy, fouling their work.

In Swabia all spinning must be finished by Christmas Eve, and no new work begun until the end of the Twelfth Night. Near the Hörselberg the opposite is the case: flax is loaded onto the spindles on Christmas Eve, when Holda begins her rounds promising As many threads, as many good years, and all must be finished by the time she returns at Epiphany, this time promising As many threads, as many bad years.

Festivals are observed for Holda in parts of Germany, generally on Christmas Eve or Twelfth Night, or for the entire Twelve Days of Christmas, and during these times there are often prohibitions regarding spinning.

While governing domestic chores, Holda is also strongly associated with the outside wilderness, wild animals and places remote from man. Frau Holda’s festival is in the middle of winter, the time when humans retreat indoors from the cold; it may be of significance that the Twelve Days of Christmas were originally the Zwölften (“the Twelve”), which like the same period in the Celtic calendar were an intercalary period during which the dead were thought to roam abroad.

Holda seems to personify the weather that transforms the land, for when it snows, it is said that Holda is shaking out her feather pillows; fog is smoke from her fire, and thunder is heard when she reels her flax. Holda traditionally appears in either of two forms: that of a snaggle-toothed, crooked-nosed old woman, or a shining youthful maiden clothed in white. As the maiden in white, her garments resemble the gleaming white of a fresh mantle of snow.

While Holda is generally described as unmarried, and has no children of her own, she is the protectress of children, the kind spirit who would rock a child’s cradle when its nurse fell asleep. She is said to own a sacred pool, through which the souls of newborn children enter the world.

Mother Goose is believed to be based on Holda who is a kindly and wise, if slightly horrific crone who rewards the industrious and punishes the lazy. The goose aspect is from a legend tradition that says that snow is a result of Frau Holda shaking out her bed linens.

Later canonical and church documents make her synonymous with Diana, Herodias, Bertha, Richella and Abundia. Historian Carlo Ginzburg has identified remarkably similar beliefs existing throughout Europe for over a thousand years, whereby men and women were thought to leave their bodies in spirit and follow a goddess variously called Holda, Diana, Herodias, Signora Oriente, Richella, Arada and Perchta.

He also identifies strong morphological similarities with the earlier goddesses Hecate/Artemis, Artio, the Matres of Engyon, the Matronae and Epona, as well as figures from fairy-tales, such as Cinderella.

The name Hludana is found in five Latin inscriptions: three from the lower Rhine. Many attempts have been made to interpret this name. The most steadfast connections are with Frau Holle and Hulda on one hand, and the Old Norse Hlóðyn, a byname for the Earth, Thor’s mother, on the other.

She is also frequently equated with Nerthus, in Germanic paganism a goddess associated with fertility, who also rides in a wagon, and Odin’s wife, Frigg, from her alternate names Frau Guaden [Wodan], Frau Goden, and Frau Frekke as well as her position as mistress of the Wild Hunt. The similarity of meaning and etymology between German “Holl(d)a” and Old English “Hella,” as well as both being described as leading the dead, could point to a link between them.

The name Nerthus is generally held to be a Latinized form of Proto-Germanic *Nerþuz, which is the Proto-Germanic precursor to the Old Norse deity name Njörðr, who is a male deity in works recorded in the 13th century. Various scholarly theories exist regarding the goddess and her potential later traces amongst the Germanic peoples.

The connection between the two is due to the linguistic relationship between Njörðr and the reconstructed Proto-Germanic *Nerþuz, Nerthus being the feminine, Latinized form of what Njörðr would have looked like around the first century.

Jörð is the common word for earth in Old Norse, as are the word’s descendants in the modern Scandinavian languages; Icelandic jörð, Faroese jørð, Danish, Swedish and Norwegian jord. It is cognate to English “earth” through Old English eorðe.

In Norse mythology, Jörð is a female jötunn. She is the mother of Thor and the personification of the Earth. Jörð is reckoned a goddess, like other jötnar who coupled with the gods. Jörð’s name appears in skaldic poetry both as a poetic term for the land and in kennings for Thor. She is usually thought to be identical with Hludana. Fjörgyn and Hlóðyn are considered to be other names for Jörð.

Bynames of the Earth in Icelandic poetry include Jörð, Fjörgyn, Hlóðyn, and Hlín. Hlín is used as a byname of both Jörð and Frigg. Fjörgynn (a masculine form of Fjörgyn) is said to be Frigg’s father, while the name Hlóðyn is most commonly linked to Frau Holle, as well as to a goddess, Hludana, whose name is found etched in several votive inscriptions from the Roman era.

In Norse mythology, the feminine Fjörgyn (Old Norse “earth”) is described as the mother of the god Thor, son of Odin, and the masculine Fjörgynn is described as the father of the goddess Frigg, wife of Odin. Both names appear in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. A number of theories surround the names, and they have been the subject of scholarly discourse.

Hilda Ellis Davidson theorizes that Fjörgyn and Fjörgynn may have represented a divine pair of which little information has survived, along with figures such as the theorized Ullr and Ullin, Njörðr and Nerthus, and the attested Freyr and Freyja.

Theories have been proposed that Fjörgyn may represent an extension of an earlier Proto-Indo-European thunder or rain god or goddess due to Indo-European linguistic connections between Norse Fjörgyn, the Hindu rain god Parjanya, the Lithuanian god Perkūnas, and the Slavic god Perun.

Compareable goddesses

Hela

- another version of the name Hel. Also Helle.

Hecate

- Guardian of the crossroads and patron of witches.

Holle

- Frau Holle is the kindly mistress who guards those who do not die in battle. She holds them in preparation for reincarnation.

Holda

- Dame Holda is a precursor to Mother Goose. She is guardian of children who die. She shakes her feather matress to make it snow.

Idunna

- Goddess aspect whose apples feed the gods and give them immortality (much like the Greek ambrosia).

Isis

- Special protector and caregiver for the dead. Sits with Osiris in judgment of souls.

Kali

- Death Goddess aspect. Destroyer and bringer of life. Kali enables reincarnation and life by destroying the old. Hel represents this harsh Goddess aspect.

Heimdallr

Friday, 28 March 2014

MALEFICENT the movie





I know you, I walked with you once upon a dream
I know you, the gleam in your eyes is so familiar a gleam
Yet I know it’s true that visions are seldom all they seem


But if I know you, I know what you’ll do
You’ll love me at once, 

the way you did once upon a dream

DID YOU RECOGNIZE A HORNED GODDESS YET?

ONE THAT HAVE NO AGE
ONE THAT HAVE 99999 NAMES
ONE THAT HAD NO BORDERS

ONE THAT KNOW NO WAR
OUR MOTHER
BEING SATANISED
LUCIFERISED
TORNED AND CRUCIFIED
 IT WASN'T A DREAM !


A FALLEN ANGEL THAT FAUGHT EVIL 
would be called De-Evil
Devil
Deva (Virgin) and Div (Giant)
Veda (talk) and Vidi (see)



Virgo
Virag
Vrag-Devil



Baphomet
Scape Goat

green one


FAUN
FEM
VIN (curve- word for guilty one-slavic)

Ephessian EF
EVE (V=F)
EWE sheep



PAN
pana (girl)
Grlica (slavic) DOVE

Magna Mater
Black Virgin




8
Venus
Vesica Piscis

Fleur de Lis
Lilly
Lotus
Lillith

eye of the Ra=Rho ()

CORVUS
CUERVO curve kurva wHORe
CROW-n CRONE - aspect of triple Goddess
VRANA  WRONA  = UR-ANNA
Ur (mesopotamian and Ilyrian word for town-towers-varosh)
Anna-womb-eldest fem name
Uruanna - mesopotamian Orion

corneille CORN-E-ILLE (ear of corn-Virgo-Spica)



Dragon
Thrakian
Troja
Phoenix

snake-dragon of the Earth self...
Atargatis Draco



Aurora; Are you afraid?
I am not afraid
Aurora; Then come out!

Then you will be afraid.

Inner Goddess is almighty self,
a body and spirit,
a flower of life
all other powers combined don't come nowhere near this one.
soul ruler of life and death is fem.


Aurora is one more name of Venus next to Dawn, Zora, Zohra, Danica, Dana, Dea, Thea etc

 It is men that obscure the truth
the wars, the rapes, the kill, the torture, is work of religious fat-hers

 that dis-Troyed paradise on Earth.




Maleficent = 
male pie cunt ----F-pie is part of circle, a slice or V as well
or
mal (sick)---ef (eve)---cent (cunt)
or
ΜΗΛΟ (pronounced: meelo) APPLE-PIE-CUNT



Chemtrailed skies around Disney castle




a girl fell in sleep like death at her 16th (4x4=box) b-day 
by torn (ancient society of black torn-Sandan-Hittites- 8 black torns in a ring)
she fell on a prick is more malicious MEANing


She walks in on a masonic floor of chess
-black and white
-1:0-
on (he) or off (eve)

duality

Trailer; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EYemY3xFsB4
song; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kjkc7A5XoWk


TORNs of Hittites but also torns of a ROSE (Venus Rose)

bits on Satan origins
Sandas Hittites

Sandas


Sandas (more commonly spelt as "Sandan") was the Anatolian (Hittite) LION god during the Classical period. He used to be represented in association with a horned lion, and often resided inside a pyre surmounted by an eagle. Sandan was often associated to the Greek god Herakles, and sometimes to Marduk. In ceremonies, an image of the god was placed inside a pyre and was set on fire.
Sandan appears in the coins of the Seleucids, as well as on other coins of Tarsus (Cilicia) during the time of the Roman emperors.

Coin of Antiochus VIII Grypus. Reverse: god Sandan standing on the horned lion, in his pyre surmounted by an eagle.

Bronze sesterce from Tarsus (Cilicia) with bust of Caracalla (211-217) on the obverse, and god Sandan on the reverse.

SANDA-SHANDA-SATAN-SANTA
ANCIENT LIONESS
THE FIRST 
THE GODDESS
(for now oldest goddess with lionesses is from Katal Huyuk 
estimated to be about 40000 years old)

Males took all her symbols and her names.

 

I remember you...

and I want YOU back!















Sunday, 16 March 2014

SHE WOLF of ROME


I stumbled upon this article called 'La Donna Lupa Paleolitica' and for those 'not in the know' LUPA means a whore in spanish. This is how I-Dea of male god and negative feminine principles have come to be.


http://susanslambdawolfblog.blogspot.be/2014/01/la-donna-lupa-paleolitica.html


Paleolitic she-wolf.


I was reading a while ago that Roman Romulus and Remus have a much older Etruscan counterpart with she-wolf and two girls. I couldn't find this story again but I found this genuine coin that tells more then any words of his-story.


TADAAA! 
GIRLS founded Rome.


here are some excerpt from official his-story;

Romulus and Remus are the twin brothers and central characters of Rome's foundation myth. Their mother is Rhea Silvia or Ila, daughter to Numitor, king of Alba Longa. Before their conception, Numitor's brother Amulius seizes power, kills Numitor's male heirs and forces Rhea Silvia to become a Vestal Virgin, sworn to chastity. Rhea Silvia conceives the twins by the god Mars, or by the demi-god Hercules; once the twins are born, Amulius has them abandoned to die in the river Tiber. They are saved by a series of miraculous interventions: the river carries them to safety, a she-wolf (in Latin, lupa) finds and suckles them, and a woodpecker feeds them. A shepherd and his wife find them and foster them to manhood, as simple shepherds. The twins, still ignorant of their true origins, prove to be natural leaders. Each acquires many followers. When they discover the truth of their birth, they kill Amulius and restore Numitor to his throne. Rather than wait to inherit Alba Longa, they choose to found a new city.

Rhea Silvia is referance to etruscan Silvan or Cillens (Baphomet-Pan)
But Pan is a she because for millenias SHE wore horns presenting all kinds of good things such as life, Lady Luna that gives and gives, horns of Venus etc
and she was parthenogenetic thus complete or both fem and male
(as is standard for any god and all gods-completion of genders).


Numitor is referance to one that names all things and we know who that is in bible, Adam off curse...
(adam reversed mada or mother)
Adam means red in hebrew.


details;
Romulus wants to found the new city on the Palatine Hill;
Remus prefers the Aventine Hill. They agree to determine the site through augury but when each claims the results in his own favor, they quarrel and Remus is killed. Romulus founds the new city, names it Rome, after himself, and creates its first legions and senate. The new city grows rapidly, swelled by landless refugees; as most of these are male, and unmarried, Romulus arranges the abduction of women from the neighboring Sabines. The ensuing war ends with the joining of Sabines and Romans as one Roman people. Thanks to divine favour and Romulus' inspired leadership, Rome becomes a dominant force, but Romulus himself becomes increasingly autocratic, and disappears or dies in mysterious circumstances. In later forms of the myth, he ascends to heaven, and is identified with Quirinus, the divine personification of the Roman people.


middle section of the picture this;Romulus arranges the abduction of women from the neighboring Sabines.


and article goes on;
The legend as a whole encapsulates Rome's ideas of itself, its origins and moral values. For modern scholarship, it remains one of the most complex and problematic of all foundation myths, particularly in the matter and manner of Remus' death. Ancient historians had no doubt that Romulus gave his name to the city.


Changed Name of Rome

Most modern historians believe his name a back-formation from the name Rome; the basis for Remus' name and role remain subjects of ancient and modern speculation. The myth was fully developed into something like an "official", chronological version in the Late Republican and early Imperial era; Roman historians dated the city's foundation to between 758 and 728 BC, and Plutarch reckoned the twins' birth year as c. 27/28 March 771 BC. An earlier tradition that gave Romulus a distant ancestor in the semi-divine Trojan prince Aeneas was further embellished, and Romulus was made the direct ancestor of Rome's first Imperial dynasty. Possible historical bases for the broad mythological narrative remain unclear and disputed. The image of the she-wolf suckling the divinely fathered twins became an iconic representation of the city and its founding legend, making Romulus and Remus preeminent among the feral children of ancient mythography.



All of the coins bellow are older aledged myth of Rome and found on territories of today Italy - old Rhaetia or Etruria(made-up term) and today Balkan or ancient Helm, ex Illyria and Lydia ,homeland of Troja.